BACHELOR OF JOURNALISM

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The Bachelor of Journalism at Macleay College is not a theoretical course – you will be working on real stories in a real newsroom from day one – learning everything about TV, radio, print, mobile and digital journalism. You’ll experience the rush of working to a deadline and complete specialist journalism training in sport, music, fashion, food and lifestyle writing, investigative reporting and business journalism.

Macleay College’s Bachelor of Journalism gives graduates a passport to the world, with links to top journalism schools in the US, UK and China. You’ll also complete journalism internships where you’ll gain hands on media experience – another reason why employers love Macleay graduates.

CRICOS CODE: 080557M

FEES

DOMESTIC STUDENTS

2017

2018

Per Unit

Annual Per Unit

Annual

$2,800

$33,600 $2,900

$34,800

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

2017

2018

Per Unit

Annual Per Unit

Annual

$3,360 $40,320 $3,360

$40,320

CAREER OUTCOMES

Dream of being a TV Reporter, Radio Presenter, Fashion Editor, Sports Commentator, News Writer or Social Media expert? These are just some of the dream journalism careers waiting for you after studying our Diploma of Journalism.

Other Journalism careers include:

  • Politcal Writer
  • Newspaper Journalist
  • Investigative Journalist
  • Sports Writer
  • Beauty Editor
  • Beauty Blogger
  • Fashion Writer
  • Radio Host
  • Podcaster… and more!

 

Check out Hatch – the Macleay Journalism student newsroom:

Hatch Logo@2x

 

 

 

Macleay College is an Official Sponsor of the Young Walkley Awards

Walkleys_Logo

Course Features

  • Full Time
    2 Years
  • Part Time
    4 Years
  • International
    3 Years
  • Units
    24
  • Internship
    120 HRS
  • Campus
    MelbourneSydney
  • ATAR
    65
  • Fee Help
    yes
  • IELTS
    6.5
  • Evening Classes
    no
LEVEL 1
MEDIA HISTORY AND THE ETHICS OF NEWSThis unit assists students in developing and enhancing their understanding of the media – its role, culture, power and effects – and encourages analysis of current media, recognising Australia’s diverse treatment and presentation of news. Students will gain knowledge of current affairs and newsworthy events in Australia and internationally. The issue of journalistic ethics will underpin all lectures, tutorials and discussions. Through practical exercises students will consider the issue of ethics in conjunction with writing-based exercises that will further develop their news writing ability.
FOUNDATIONS OF NEWSThis unit teaches the basic elements of news gathering, reporting and writing in news style. The primary goals of this unit are to develop the foundation skills of a reporter – news values, how to assess the merits of different stories, how to write a newsworthy intro, how to structure a story and get the facts in the right order, and how to cover events in real time such as press conferences and court cases.
NEWS RESEARCHThis unit introduces students to traditional and digitally driven news research. Each week students will learn and discuss the best way to develop and research story ideas and the tools needed to find what is true and accurate, particularly in the current ‘post truth’ and ‘fake news’ era. It will also demonstrate that the best story ideas are borne out of critical and original thinking.
DATA JOURNALISMData journalism is a journalistic process based on analysing and filtering large data sets to find news stories. Sourcing and importing data, scraping for data and creating your own data sets have become core skills in digital newsrooms around the world. You will learn how to perform these tasks as well as visualise data in order for it to be easily comprehensible to an audience. Whilst data driven journalism deals with open data that is freely available online and analysed with open source tools, this unit introduces students to the ethical and legal limits of the craft.

 

LEVEL 2
MEDIA LAW AND PRACTICEThis unit is designed to help students achieve a fundamental understanding of Media Law and it’s role in protecting the rights of the journalist, the public and the publisher. Students will be taught the legal risks associated with newsgathering, and with published content. It will help develop the skills necessary to recognise questionable information and potential breaches. Students will examine the law as it relates to different platforms and different jurisdictions. They will experience a court in action and be shown how media laws shape coverage of current events.
VIDEO JOURNALISMIn this unit, you will learn the skills needed to be a video or TV journalist in the digital age: how to perform in front of the camera, shooting a story, editing, script writing, and packaging using editing systems like Final Cut Pro and Premier.You will write an essay, complete a scripting and interviewing assessment and complete a practical exercise, which together will give you a combined mark for the unit. Note that the practical exercise will be done in the field in teams to make it as realistic as possible and that it will also include peer assessment.
FEATURE WRITINGThis unit introduces students to the different styles of feature writing and pitching ideas to magazines and newspapers. Students will learn the difference between hard news stories and features, the different structures used by feature writers to engage with their audience and the difference between writing long form stories for hard copy newspapers and digital publications. The course also teaches students the craft of writing the perfect sentence, the perfect paragraph and, therefore, the perfect feature. Student written features which achieve this will be published on the Macleay student journalism website.
MOJOMobile journalism where journalists conceive, research, shoot and edit their stories on their mobile devices is fast becoming a core and required skills in all newsrooms. This unit will guide students through the various workflows available and the technical fundamentals associated with digital media production, with a strong emphasis in the mobile platform (iOS, Andriod, MobilePC). They will learn to troubleshoot and work with the ever increasing app libraries as offered by the various manufacturers and they will apply this knowledge to produce broadcast quality radio and video packages.

 

LEVEL 3
REPORTING ON GOVERNMENT AND INSTITUTIONSThis unit will explain the roles of central and local government and examine the relationship between journalists and these institutions. It will also explore the public role of other important institutions such as religious organisations and NGOs.Students will cover local councils and national politics in practical exercises and learn to assess the comparative news value of government decisions. They will learn how and where to obtain information from council agendas and central government records and how to distinguish between news and government spin. They will look at the intersection between the public role of the journalist and the public interest in effective government.
RADIO JOURNALISMThis unit teaches students the skills associated with producing audio content, including scriptwriting, packaging using phone apps, and podcasting. These skills will be taught in the context of digital, multi media productions.Students will develop a radio voice as well as reporting skills and learn how to work in a radio newsroom, broadcast live and produce podcasts. They will produce audio packages for the Macleay Newsroom website.
NEWS PHOTOGRAPHYLearn the techniques of news and features photography and the art of photojournalism, a skill that can take you around the globe. Students will learn how to shoot a photo essay and complete a magazine assignment in “in-field” exercises. .
PROFESSIONAL NEWS PRACTICE/INTERNSHIP 1This unit will cover the information and skills required for students to establish a complete set of proactive job- seeking skills and tools. They will use their writing, production and web skills to work towards producing a curriculum vitae and will be taught how to develop a social media profile as an engaged and aware journalist. Students will learn and practice the skills required for job applications and interviews and understand the value of networking. They will also be trained to make They will have a keen understanding of the unique industry they are entering – the way it operates and the opportunities it can provide them.

 

LEVEL 4
MEDIA & NEWS ENTREPRENEURSHIPMedia is in a state of flux. But flux isn’t all bad news. It can be great news if you have ideas, energy and ingenuity. In this course, you will taught how to use your creativity and business acumen to create new media ideas.Experienced entrepreneurs and journalism tutors will work with you in tutorials to help merge your journalism skill sets and provide guidance with the various stages of your in-class project. The aim of the project is to come up with new ideas to keep journalism relevant and vital whilst providing you with employment.
NEWSROOM 1In addition to attending timetabled classes in Newsroom 1, students will practice what they are learning in The Newsroom on campus – an online operation showcasing the best- written work across all genres. When they are not in a Newsroom 1 class or any other class, students will be producing news items. Some students may choose to cover daily stories for which there will be a daily deadline set by the tutors. Others might choose to work on longer form, investigative stories. Work that meets Macleay’s editorial standards will be uploaded to our student website.
INTERNATIONAL REPORTINGYou will engage with the issues of reporting in a world without borders – where all stories can be local. You will learn how to deal with issues of culture and language and you will examine the ethics of parachute journalism and how to responsibly report in countries you may be just visiting.You will discuss the modern implications of the Mark Twain rule – how a lie can go round the world before the truth gets its boots on. The unit will also examine, through case histories, the do’s and don’ts of being a Foreign Correspondent.
JOURNALISM ELECTIVE 1Deepen your specialist knowledge by electing advanced study units from the elective unit available.

 

LEVEL 5
WRITTEN MEDIA PROJECTThis unit will prepare students for one of the most challenging tasks they may face in their journalism careers: writing a long-form piece. With students having already completed Feature Writing (FEW 112), the focus of this unit is to fashion a single, original text that utilises journalistic and writing skills, including research, that is good enough to pitch to an editor. The choice of subject will be discussed with the tutor who will advise the student on the viability of their subject. Weekly lectures will involve a presentation followed by class discussion, the dissection of some of journalisms most notable features and prescribed readings/viewings.
NEWSROOM 2The unit allows the student to practise advanced disciplines of digital journalism under the supervision of their tutors. Students will work in The Newsroom on campus – an online operation showcasing the work produced by students, including daily stories they may wish to produce or be directed to produce. The newsroom runs as a daily operation for three days a week but students will be expected to carry out news gathering assignments on other days and should keep a weekly log of their published stories.
GLOBALISATIONJournalists today are able to reach distant audiences faster and more directly than ever before. In such a globally connected news environment, what role does the “fourth estate” play in shaping the news? From Google operating in China, to Al-Jazeera offices in Manhattan, to a young woman blogging about an attack on her school in Afghanistan – how is journalism adapting to a more globalised media?This unit will explore globalism in theory and practice. It will look at media models from around the world and help students better understand the global news environment. You will be assigned a country to follow through news events as reported by their local media and by Australia’s and you will be asked to critically assess the difference.
JOURNALISM ELECTIVE 2Deepen your specialist knowledge by electing advanced study units from the elective unit available.

  

LEVEL 6
MULTI MEDIA PROJECTThis unit is a trimester long project which provides students with a chance to explore in depth a field of interest to them, using journalistic writing and storytelling skills. The choice of subject will be discussed with the tutor who will advise the student on the viability of their project. Students will then tackle a subject that is different from their written project and will produce a long form visual essay; it could be in the form of a documentary or short film or a gallery of photojournalism. Examples include a documentary on humour or short film about anthropology or a gallery of photojournalism on Melbourne’s historic sites.
NEWSROOM 3/INTERNSHIP 2The unit allows the student to practice the disciplines of digital journalism under the supervision of their tutors and at an advanced level in internship placement. Students will be able to identify and discuss the ethical and legal dimensions of the daily practice of a fast-paced, 24/7 digital journalism in a Newsroom setting and be encouraged to think critically about the industry changes that continually change the practice of journalism. All students and tutors will work under the Macleay College journalism code of conduct. Students will work in The Newsroom on campus – an online operation showcasing the work produced by students, including on daily stories they may wish to produce or which they be asked to produce. The publication of student work on the Newsroom website is at the discretion of the editor, a tutor. The newsroom will run as a daily operation for three days a week but students will be expected to carry out news gathering assignments on other days and should keep a weekly log of their assignments.
FUNDAMENTALS OF CODINGIn the world of digital media and news production, being able to understand and speak the language of coders is invaluable and increasingly essential. In this course you will learn these skills and even learn how to create your own website where you can park your journalism!
JOURNALISM ELECTIVE 3Deepen your specialist knowledge by electing advanced study units from the elective unit available.

  

ELECTIVES
SPORTS JOURNALISMStudents will learn about the challenges of covering events, both live and in retrospect, that may have been seen by millions of people who all think they know what happened. You will look at the challenges of covering sports stars and sporting institutions, and the commercial and emotional pressures of covering the ‘home team’. Most importantly you will learn how important it is to place sport in a wider cultural space that allows you to evaluate and critically analyse its impact on Australia.
FASHION WRITINGLearn the skills of fashion reporting, from catwalks to factories, from hard news to consumer reviews. You will look at the various ways journalism engages with the industry – reporter, critic, reviewer – and practice each. And you will learn the critical importance fashion writing plays in a wider socio-cultural environment in Australia.
MUSIC AND MOVIE JOURNALISMMusic is a part of our daily life and a huge international industry. This unit studies the history of reporting music, the different genres of music reporting, the emotions involved and how to reflect these in writing, and the ins and outs of accessing information about a specialist area. You will learn how to profile music and musicians.
FOOD, LIFESTYLE AND TRAVELFood and lifestyle writing has seen a revival in the past 5 years and has become a specialist genre of media production. In this course you will learn about the different styles of media production in food, lifestyle and travel, including blogging and magazine restaurant reviewing.
INVESTIGATIVE REPORTINGThis course will enable students to study the history of international reporting, the development of foreign correspondents and their role in informing world opinion, and how these roles have changed in the age of the Internet. They will examine the tension between the theory and practice of reporting from countries outside their domicile and develop the knowledge and skills to make critical judgements on the ethical issues.
BUSINESS JOURNALISMCovering business and the economy is one of the growth areas of journalism. You will learn how business functions and why news about the economy is so important.
PHOTOJOURNALISMYou will learn the theoretical and practical fundamentals for the production of great photo essays. You will be exposed to the potential of the medium through the exploration of current reportage and documentary photography in print and digital mediums.
SHORTHANDYou will learn the theoretical and practical fundamentals for the production of great photo essays. You will be exposed to the potential of the medium through the exploration of current reportage and documentary photography in print and digital mediums.

 

DOMESTIC STUDENTS

2017

2018

Per Unit

Annual Per Unit

Annual

$2,800

$33,600 $2,900

$34,800

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

2017

2018

Per Unit

Annual Per Unit

Annual

$3,360 $40,320 $3,360

$40,320

Dream of being a TV Reporter, Radio Presenter, Fashion Editor, Sports Commentator, News Writer or Social Media expert? These are just some of the dream journalism careers waiting for you after studying our Diploma of Journalism.

Other Journalism careers include:

  • Politcal Writer
  • Newspaper Journalist
  • Investigative Journalist
  • Sports Writer
  • Beauty Editor
  • Beauty Blogger
  • Fashion Writer
  • Radio Host
  • Podcaster… and more!
Monica Attard

Monica Attard

SYDNEY

Monica Attard is Head of the Journalism faculty. She has been a journalist for more than 35 years, working much of that time at the ABC where she was a foreign correspondent, reporter and program host. Monica has hosted most of the ABC’s prime time current affairs programs, including PM, The World Today and Media Watch. She is the recipient of five Walkley Awards for Excellence in Journalism, an Order of Australia, and an Arts/Law degree. Monica is also the author of a best-selling book on the collapse of Soviet communism, called Russia: Which Way Paradise?  She facilitates Q and A style debates at corporate conferences and conducts interviews with leaders across many industries as part of her Facilitation business. Monica is a total news junky whose advice to all students entering Macleay College to study journalism is to immerse themselves in the world of knowledge, information and the digital evolution.

Colin McKinnon 2

Colin McKinnon

MELBOURNE

Colin McKinnon oversees the Newsroom in Melbourne and teaches Business Journalism. He has been a journalist and journalism educator for nearly 40 years and has worked in more than 30 countries. His career began with Reuters in Fleet Street, London. He was a correspondent in Asia and Africa, an editor in London, and the news agency’s global training editor for a decade. In Australia, from 1999 to 2015, he led Fairfax’s editorial training team, recruiting, selecting and training journalists for The AgeThe Sydney Morning Herald and The Australian Financial Review.

Stacey Murray

Stacey Murray

Melbourne

Stacey Murray is the Journalism Program Coordinator for Macleay in Melbourne. Stacey has a shorthand speed of 90 wpm and teaches Shorthand for Journalists and Professional News Practice. She is a Director of Alfalfa Social Media, a company that specialises in social media marketing and training for small businesses.

Terry Brown

Terry Brown

MELBOURNE

Terry Brown teaches the Media History & the Ethics of News, and Foundations of News units at the Melbourne campus. Terry was a senior journalist, columnist and colour writer with the Herald Sun, Australia’s best-selling daily newspaper, eventually leaving to write novels and to teach.  In his 25 years with The Sun and later The Herald Sun, he worked on almost every big story and major sporting and news event of the era, from the Hoddle and Queen St massacres of the late 1980s through the gangland wars to the Black Saturday fires. Exceptionally versatile, he has covered the Property, Industrial Relations and Religious Affairs rounds, 20 Melbourne Cups, State and Federal elections, served as News Ltd’s national Defence Correspondent and chief of staff. He worked on the much loved A Place in The Sun and In Black and White columns, wrote features, editorials, news, colour and humour.

Donna Demaio2

Donna Demaio

MELBOURNE

Donna teaches Fashion Writing, and Food, Lifestyle and Travel at the Melbourne Campus. She is a 3AW radio senior journalist, newsreader, editor, arts, entertainment and travel reporter. She has worked as a travel writer for the magazine Arrivals and Departures and is an ongoing contributor to the Age online/SMH online. Donna covers events including the Spring Racing Carnival, Formula One Grand Prix, Melbourne Fashion Week, The Logies, The AACTA film awards, Melbourne International Film Festival, and the Melbourne Comedy Festival. Face to face interviews include Clint Eastwood, Harrison Ford, Hugh Jackman, Liam Hemsworth, Stephen Fry, Jerry Hall and Daniel Craig.

Wendy Squires

Wendy Squires

Melbourne

Wendy Squires teaches the Feature Writing unit and has been a journalist and editor for more than 25 years, starting her career at News Ltd as a cadet journalist before working her way to magazines and television. She has been the editor of Cleo and Australian Style magazines and held senior roles on Who Weekly, The Australian Women’s Weekly, Madison and Woman’s Day. In 2000 she returned to News Ltd where she created the Body + Soul insert magazine, edited all News Ltd’s Olympic Games magazines and helped launch Fox Studios. She has also written for numerous titles including The Bulletin, Cosmopolitan, Good Health, Men’s Style, Mode, Shop, People and ELLE. In 2009 her novel, The Boys’ Club, was published, based on her year as the Publicity Director at Network Nine. Today, she writes a syndicated opinion column for The Age, freelances for many magazines and websites, appears as a commentator on Sky News and ghost authors biographies for PanMacmillan. She is also writing her second novel.

Tony Kleu

Tony Kleu

SYDNEY

Tony Kleu, a working journalist with wide experience, oversees the Newsroom and teaches the Written Media Project. After 10 years with The Guardian newspaper in London he was recruited by Fairfax to chief sub the Sydney Morning Herald’s foreign news pages. He left Fairfax after 20 years as a writer and editor, including stints as Opinion editor and Higher Education writer, and in the training unit. Since 2007 he has been a freelance editor, copywriter and Plain English teacher.

Aletheia Casey

Aletheia Casey

SYDNEY

Aletheia Casey is a Sydney based photographer with over 15 years experience and has been working as a photography lecturer for over five years. Previously Aletheia worked as a Photographer and Visual Journalist in the film and television industry for clients such as BBC London, BBC World and SBS Television. During the last four years she has published and worked with The Sunday Times Magazine, The Financial Times Magazine, Getty Images Worldwide, Australian Associated Press, and various international publications.

Aletheia has exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, The Royal Shakespeare Company (London), The National Geographic Society (London) and the Australian Centre for Photography. She was named a winner of The Magenta Foundation Flash Forward Emerging Photographer Award for the UK in 2012 and 2015, a finalist for the National Photographic Portrait Prize and Bronze and Silver winner in the Documentary category of the PX3 Awards in France. Aletheia has twice been named a finalist for the Environmental Photographer of the Year Award.

Aletheia recently completed her Masters of Photojournalism and Documentary Photography through the London College of Communication and graduated with Distinction

Leah Creigthon

Leah Creighton

SYDNEY

Leah Creighton is the Journalism Internship Coordinator. She is a journalist with 15 years’ experience, working at The Australian, and The Daily and Sunday Telegraphs. An online news specialist, she was the editor of The Sunday Telegraph Online for five years and the author of the Telegraph’s first news blog. Leah is a hard-news journalist who honed her skills as a beat reporter for many years at The Sunday Telegraph. An Irish literature prize-winner from the University of NSW, she runs a freelance writing and editing business, Writin’ Creighton and tutors in English language, grammar and shorthand.

Antoinette Lattouf

Antoinette Lattouf

SYDNEY

Antoinette Lattouf teaches the Investigative Journalism unit. Antoinette is a cross-platform journalist with more than 12 years’ experience. Her career spans television, radio and online. Antoinette is a multi-award-winning journalist and a Walkley finalist, and has worked on a range of programs at the ABC, SBS, Channel 10 and triple j. She was part of the team that helped launch ABC’s News24, has worked as a columnist and a breakfast television panellist.